Monthly Archives: October 2012

How to Give Your Dog a Bath

As much as we all love for our furry friends to smell fresh and clean, getting to that point isn’t always easy. Dogs are rarely excited to jump into the bathtub for a good scrub. Bathing fearful dogs might be better handled by a professional groomer or your veterinary office. But if you decide to wade in, here are some helpful hints.Give Your Dog a BathGetting YOU Ready
Be sure you’re donning clothes that you’re okay with getting wet and dirty (and furry). Move all your grooming materials into the bathroom shampoo (ask your vet for suggestions specific to your dog), conditioner (a must for longer coats that need to be brushed out), brush, mineral oil (for eyes), cotton balls (for ears), at least two big, absorbent towels and, most importantly, TREATS. Lay a non-skid mat down in the tub to help the dog keep his footing. If you don’t have a detachable showerhead, a bowl or even a large cup is helpful in rinsing.

Getting (Fido) Ready
Trimming your pet’s nails prior to bath time will not only give your dog better footing, it will also help protect your skin in case he tries to make a break for it. Now, bring the dog into the bathroom and close the door behind you catching a wet, soapy dog running down your hallway is no easy task! Give praise and treats to make him comfortable in the bathroom before you try to get him into the tub. If you’re able to, gently putting a cotton ball in each ear can help keep water out — just be sure to remove them when you’re finished! Also, to help keep shampoo from irritating his eyes, you can put a drop of mineral oil in each one.

Bring on the Suds
Dogs are unlikely to get into the tub willingly. For bigger dogs, a second person to help you get Fido into the bath can help avoid straining your back. Make sure water isn’t too hot or too cold. Let your dog hear and then gently feel the water before going full-speed ahead with the bath. Start shampooing your dog’s shoulders and then move out from there. Be gentle around the face and any sensitive areas but be sure you get down to the undercoat. Read the directions on the shampoo bottle carefully to ensure proper usage. Rinse out all the shampoo, using your fingers to make sure you get through the undercoat to avoid subsequent irritation. This is where a detachable showerhead or bowl comes in handy to be sure bigger dogs get rinsed thoroughly.

No More Tangles
After the shampoo has been completely rinsed out, you can apply conditioner, if desired. Follow the directions on the bottle because some products need to sit on the coat for several minutes. If you have a particularly squirmy dog, you’ll want to find a fast-acting formula. Once you have finished the bath, it is time to dry your pooch. Towel dry as much as possible in the bathroom. For dogs with longer coats, you may want to use a blow dryer set on low. Before the dog leaves the bathroom, brush his coat out thoroughly because the bath will loosen up a lot of fur, which is better contained in the bathroom than all over the house. Many dogs get “after-bath-crazies,” so hold onto your hat and let ‘em run!

**Article Courtesy of Petfinder.com**

Dog Park Etiquette

Once you and your dog get to the dog park, it’s tempting to just stand back and watch all the activity. But everybody will have a much more rewarding time if you observe some basic etiquette for visiting a dog park. Many of the suggestions below are more common sense than anything, but they should be heeded. These may not be official dog park rules, but following this etiquette will make the dog park / dog run a better place for all who visit.Dog Park EtiquetteDog parks aren’t a right, they’re a privilege. – Please don’t let bad behavior ruin things for everyone else.

  • Never leave your dog unattended.
  • Always clean up after your dog. Most parks have poopbags or scoopers, so use them. This is a primary reason that dog parks get complaints, so pay attention and pick up the poop.
  • Make sure your dog is current on her shots and has a valid license.
  • Don’t bring dogs younger than 4 months to a dog park. They won’t have had all the necessary inoculations that allow them to play safely with other animals.
  • Don’t bring a female dog in season if not spayed.
  • Spayed/neutered animals are recommended.
  • Don’t bring more than two or maybe three dogs. It subjects parks to overuse, and if they’re not your dogs, you may not have full control over them. It’s hard enough for many people to watch one dog!
  • Keep your dog on-leash until you get to the off-leash area. This is not just respectful to other park users; it’s much safer for your dog.
  • Close all doors to the dog park or dog run after entering or exiting.
  • If your dog becomes unruly or plays rough, leash him and leave immediately.
  • If you must bring children to a dog park, supervise them closely.
  • Don’t smoke or eat while at the dog park. Cigarette butts and food wrappers are tempting treats to dogs, but bad for them.
  • Always observe all of the rules posted at your local dog park. Each town has its own set of regulations: please follow them.

**Article Courtesy of DogPark.com**